What McDonald’s Self-Order Kiosks Mean for Fast Food

As McDonald’s embraces self-service across its branches worldwide, we take a look at what the McDonald’s self-order kiosk means for fast food.

A better McDonald’s

As the competition has begun to eat away at both McDonald’s ordering model and the quality of it’s menu, the golden arches have struck back with a targeted revamp that covers both food quality and service.

While the problems associated with McDonald’s reputation for cheap cuts of meat and suspect preparation are being tackled with an effort to present the company as using local produce with high ethical standards, in store the ordering revolution has seen staff being supplemented with in-store, self-service kiosks.

Since 2015, hundreds of self-service kiosks have been rolled out to McDonald’s stores in the UK.

Lower costs

The most immediate benefit adopting self-order kiosks is cost-related. McDonald’s self-order kiosks don’t require management. They’re consistent in terms of motivation and delivery, can be updated effortlessly from a centralised location and can provide immediately recognisable contact points from store to store.

Since installing the kiosks, McDonald’s have reported their value as being at an all time high.

Speed and choice

By using a kiosk to order rather than relaying details to a person behind a till, customers are more in control of exactly what goes into their order. No more awkward requests to remove tomatoes and pickles; customers can build a burger directly to their own specification in any McDonald’s store. Did we mention that they reduce queues too?

It also means they’re in control of how quickly they proceed through the customer journey, with no impact from geography. Analysts believe that kiosks will improve overall sales as well as specific goals, such as cooking quarter-pounders with fresh beef. If fewer staff are standing waiting to take orders, more staff can be on hand to cook newly ordered meals quickly, minimising waste or standing food and making good on the more wholesome promises McDonald’s has made to revamp its image.

Consistent interaction

Customers who are used to using kiosks will find the exact same level of service in any McDonald’s the world over. They’ll have set expectations that are easier to meet, you won’t have to worry about staff making mistakes when taking the order and sooner or later getting a Big Mac will be tantamount to muscle memory.

The touch screens can help engender and foster pickier, more relaxed dining. Within the create your taste menu, you can customise up to 30 burgers, 2 types of buns, 12 toppings and nine sauces. Not a bad way to encourage your customers to touch your produce.

Better staffing for human-orientated tasks

Fewer people taking the orders means more behind the grill. McDonald’s has repeatedly said that adding kiosks won’t result in mass layoffs, but rather it presents an opportunity for them to rejig their staffing schedules to meet demand in other parts of the restaurant. In the words of CEO Steve Easterbrook, “They provide an opportunity to transition back-of-the-house positions to more customer service roles such as concierges and table service where they are able to truly engage with guests and enhance the dining experience.”

While it does amount to a material change in the way that McDonalds’ staff work, it won’t result in job losses.

 

At LamasaTech we’re fascinated by the technology that’s shaping the future of fast food restaurants. If you’re a restaurant owner looking to future-proof your business, get in touch with one of our experts for a consultation.

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